Brett Hoffman: Veteran, rookie saddle bronc riders steal show in Fort Worth

Cort Scheer turns in highest mark of the night

Twenty-year-old Audy Reed makes 82-point ride

Nebraska cowboy takes lead in saddle bronc average

Cort Scheer

BY BRETT HOFFMAN

Special to the Star-Telegram

 

A veteran and a rookie stole the show in saddle bronc riding Thursday night at the Fort Worth Stock Show Rodeo.

The veteran was five-time Wrangler National Finals qualifier Cort Scheer, 29, of Elsmere, Neb., who turned in a score of 83.5, which was the highest mark of the performance at Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum.

The rookie was 20-year-old Audy Reed of Spearman, who turned in an 82.

Scheer said he was extremely fortunate that he has drawn two broncs at the Fort Worth Stock Show that could help him earn an attention-grabbing score. He posted an 80.5 during Wednesday’s performance.

“It’s really good to draw two nice horses like that,” Scheer said. “It’s really hard to do. Horses of that caliber, they just don’t grow on trees. In a situation like that, it’s your own dang fault if you can’t win on them. I just thank the stock contractors for bringing two great broncs.”

During Thursday’s show, Scheer drew a bronc named Covergirl, who was owned by the Frontier Rodeo Co. Last year, the Frontier firm, which is headed up by Jerry Nelson of Winnie, won the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Stock Contractor of the Year title.

During Wednesday’s performance, Scheer busted a bronc named Tin Man, owned by Universal Pro Rodeos.

MY DAD DIDN’T WANT ME TO START TOO EARLY. HE WANTED MY BODY TO MATURE. A LOT OF TIMES KIDS START TOO EARLY. 

Cort Scheer on learning to ride saddle broncs

After making two high-quality rides, Scheer is ranked second in the saddle bronc riding average with a two-ride score of 164. Jake Wright is ranked No. 1 with a 166.5. 

Scheer said he started riding steers when he was around 12 or 13 and saddle broncs when he was about 14 or 15. 

“My dad didn’t want me to start too early,” he said. “He wanted my body to mature. A lot of times kids start too early. Their body is not ready and they get beat up. They just can’t take it. It’s important to be physically mature and ready to go, so you won’t learn bad habits.”

Scheer was a standout competitor in both the high school and collegiate ranks. He earned four trips to the College National Finals Rodeo in Casper, Wyo. He qualified for the Wrangler National Finals in Las Vegas in 2010 and 2012-15.

I HAD BEEN HERE LAST YEAR AND SO I KNEW WHAT WAS GOING ON. IT WAS JUST ANOTHER RODEO. Audy Reed on competing in the Fort Worth rodeo

“You start at a level of competition and you master that level,” Scheer said. “A lot of people try to jump right out there too fast at the start and they’re not ready. You have to keep your confidence up, so when you nod your face (for the bronc to be turned out into the arena), you know you’re going to win.”

Reed has benefited from the advice of his father, Hadley, a former saddle bronc rider who competed for Tarleton State. Today, he competes in rodeos and works on his family ranch in the Panhandle.

Reed said he benefited from competing at the Fort Worth rodeo last year. At the time, he was classified as a “permit holder,” meaning that he was attempting to earn a PRCA membership. As the result of reaching that goal, he’s classified as a PRCA rookie this year.

“I had been here last year and so I knew what was going on,” Reed said of competing in Fort Worth. “It was just another rodeo.”


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