#NFR16 Notebook ~ Day One

                                                             Clay Walker

                                                             Clay Walker

WNFR DAILY SCHEDULE — Thursday, Dec. 1

 

Terri Clark

LOCASH

Aaron Watson

LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

 

Wrangler NFR 9-5

■ 8 a.m.-noon: PRCA National Convention registration. South Point Convention Area

 

■ 9 a.m.-noon: PRCA National Convention Contract Personnel Trade Show. South Point Exhibit Hall

■ 9 a.m.-5 p.m.: Cowboys Christmas – It’s All Here/Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Hunter &Outdoor Christmas Expo. Las Vegas Convention Center, South Halls. Free admission/open to the public.

■ 9 a.m.-5 p.m.: Cowboy Marketplace Gift Show. Mandalay Bay Hotel &Casino. Free admission/open to the public

■ 9 a.m.-5 p.m.: Country Christmas Downtown. The Pavilions at World Market Center. Free admission/open to the public.

■ 9 a.m.-6 p.m.: Western Gift Show, South Point Exhibit Hall and Boot Barn Concourse. Free admission/open to the public.

■ 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: 2016 Benny Binion’s World Famous Wrangler NFR Bucking Horse &Bull Sale. South Point Arena and Equestrian Center. United Bucking Horse Association 2- and 3-Year Futurity Finals. Tickets: South Point box office, 702-797-8055, or southpointarena.com. To benefit ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

■ 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.: Miss Rodeo America PRCA Luncheon presented by RAM and PRCA. MGM Grand Convention Center. WNFR Luncheon with stock contractors, rodeo committees, rodeo impromptu questions by Miss Rodeo America Contestants. For more information, go to www.missrodeoamerica.com and click on the MRA Store.

■ 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.: WPRA Awards Reception. South Point Grand Ballroom. Ticket required. 719-447-4627.

■ Noon-1 p.m.: Outside the Barrel with Flint Rasmussen. Cowboy Christmas, Las Vegas Convention Center, South Halls. Part of Rodeo Live presented by RODEOHOUSTON. Free admission/open to the public.

 

■ 1 p.m.: Permit Holder of Year Challenge, with live bucking horse sale. South Point Arena and Equestrian Center. Tickets: South Point box office, 702-797-8055 or southpointarena.com

■ 1:15 p.m.-2 p.m.: Keepin’ it Country with Daryle Singletary. Cowboy Christmas, Las Vegas Convention Center, South Halls. Rodeo Live presented by RODEOHOUSTON. Free admission/open to the public

Wrangler NFR In Arena Thomas &Mack Center

■ 6:45 p.m.: Opening, Road to Vegas; Anthem, Mark Wills.

■ 7 p.m.: First go-round.

Wrangler NFR After Dark

■ 6-6:30 p.m.: Wrangler NFR Countdown Show at MGM Grand. David Copperfield Theater. Free admission.

■ 6 p.m.-10 p.m.: South Point Presents Ram Rodeo Tailgate Party. South Point Convention Center. Free admission.

■ 6:30 p.m.-4 a.m.: The Mirage Presents Rodeo Vegas 2016, the official Wrangler NFR After-Party of the PRCA. The Mirage Race and Sports Book. Free admission/free concerts nightly. More information: www.Mirage.com/NFR.

■ 8 p.m.-2 a.m.: MGM Grand Gold Buckle Zone. MGM Grand Convention Center. Live entertainment featuring free concerts nightly. Free admission. More information: www.mgmgrand.com/NFR.

■ 9 p.m.-2 a.m.: The Legendary Buck’N Ball. The Orleans Hotel and Casino, Mardi Gras Ballroom. Live country music, two-step dancing and drink specials. Free admission. More information: www.BoydEvents.com/WNFR

■ 10:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m.: National Finals Tonight Show hosted by Don Gay, Joe Beaver &Dan Miller. The Orleans Showroom. Re-cap the NFR with the best crew in town and win prizes nightly. Free admission. More information: www.BoydEvents.com/WNFR.

■ 11 p.m.: Wrangler NFR Go Round Buckle Presentations hosted by Flint Rasmussen &Randy Corley. South Point Showroom. Free admission. Free concerts to follow each night. Aaron Watson (Dec. 1-4); Sierra Black (Dec. 5-6); Cody Johnson (Dec. 7-10).

Concerts

■ Aaron Watson, South Point. 866-791-7626/southpointcasino.com

■ Rodney Carrington, MGM Grand, David Copperfield Theatre. 877-880-0880/mgmgrand.com.

■ Terri Clark, Golden Nugget, The Grand. 866-946-5336/goldennugget.com

■ Casey Donahew Band and Taryn Papa, The Mirage, Race and Sports Book. 800-374-9000/mirage.com/NFR

■ LOCASH and Kevin Fowler, MGM Grand Gold Buckle Zone. 877-880-0880 or mgmgrand.com/NFR

■ Rob Staley, Treasure Island, Gilley’s. 702-894-7111/treasureisland.com

FRIDAY

Wrangler NFR 9-5

■ 9 a.m.-5 p.m.: Cowboys Christmas – It’s All Here/Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Hunter &Outdoor Christmas Expo. Las Vegas Convention Center, South Halls. Free admission/open to the public.

■ 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.: Miss Rodeo America Pageant. Fashion Show Luncheon presented by Wrangler. MGM Grand Convention Center, Gold Buckle Zone. Ticket required. Doors open 11:15 a.m. More information: www.missrodeoamerica.com, click on the MRA Store

■ Noon-1 p.m.: Outside the Barrel with Flint Rasmussen. Cowboy Christmas, Las Vegas Convention Center, South Halls. Part of Rodeo Live presented by RODEOHOUSTON. Free admission/open to the public.

■ Noon-2 p.m.: Wrangler NFR Autograph Session, Steer Wrestlers. Cowboy Christmas, Rodeo Way presented by Lucas Oil. Free admission/open to the public. First come/first served; contestants depart at 2 p.m.

■ 1 p.m.: Stace Smith World Futurity Bronc Finale. South Point Arena and Equestrian Center. Featuring top 4- and 5-year saddle bronc horses in North America. Tickets: South Point box office, 702-797-8055 or southpointarena.com.

■ 1:15 p.m.-2 p.m.: Keepin’ it Country with Daryle Singletary. Cowboy Christmas, Las Vegas Convention Center, South Halls. Rodeo Live presented by RODEOHOUSTON. Free admission/open to the public

Wrangler NFR In Arena Thomas &Mack Center

■ 6:45 p.m.: Opening, Madison MacDonald and Bobby Kerr; Anthem, Clay Walker

■ 7 p.m.: Second go-round.

Wrangler NFR After Dark

■ 6-6:30 p.m.: Wrangler NFR Countdown Show at MGM Grand. David Copperfield Theater. Free admission.

■ 6 p.m.-10 p.m.: South Point Presents Ram Rodeo Tailgate Party. South Point Convention Center. Free admission.

■ 6:30 p.m.-4 a.m.: The Mirage Presents Rodeo Vegas 2016, the official Wrangler NFR After-Party of the PRCA. The Mirage Race and Sports Book. Free admission/free concerts nightly. More information: www.Mirage.com/NFR.

■ 8 p.m.-2 a.m.: MGM Grand Gold Buckle Zone. MGM Grand Convention Center. Live entertainment featuring free concerts nightly. Free admission. More information: www.mgmgrand.com/NFR.

■ 9 p.m.-2 a.m.: The Legendary Buck’N Ball. The Orleans Hotel and Casino, Mardi Gras Ballroom. Live country music, two-step dancing and drink specials. Free admission. More information: www.BoydEvents.com/WNFR

■ 10:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m.: National Finals Tonight Show hosted by Don Gay, Joe Beaver &Dan Miller. The Orleans Showroom. Re-cap the NFR with the best crew in town and win prizes nightly. Free admission. More information: www.BoydEvents.com/WNFR.

■ 11 p.m.: Wrangler NFR Go Round Buckle Presentations hosted by Flint Rasmussen &Randy Corley. South Point Showroom. Free admission. Free concerts to follow each night. Aaron Watson (Dec. 1-4); Sierra Black (Dec. 5-6); Cody Johnson (Dec. 7-10).

Concerts

■ Aaron Watson, South Point. 866-791-7626/southpointcasino.com

■ Rodney Carrington, MGM Grand, David Copperfield Theatre. 877-880-0880/mgmgrand.com.

■ Bill Engvall, Treasure Island. 866-712-9308/treasureisland.com

■ Kevin Fowler and LOCASH, The Mirage Race &Sports Book. 800-374-9000/mirage.com/NFR.

■ Clay Walker, MGM Grand Gold Buckle Zone. 877-880-0880/mgmgrand.com/NFR.

■ Mark Wills, Hard Rock Hotel, Vinyl. 855-900-7625/hardrockhotel.com.

■ Alabama, The Chelsea at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas. 877-893-2003/ cosmopolitanlasvegas.com.

■ Lynyrd Skynyrd, Golden Nugget, The Grand. 866-946-5336/goldennugget.com.

■ Reba, Brooks &Dunn, The Colosseum at Caesars Palace. 888-929-7849/caesarspalace.com.

■ Ron White, The Mirage, Terry Fator Theatre. 800-963-9634/mirage.com.

■ George Strait, T-Mobile Arena. 702-692-1600/t-mobilearena.com.

■ Josh Turner, The Orleans Showroom. 702-284-7777/boydgamingevents.com.

■ Rob Staley, Gilley’s at Treasure Island. 702-894-7111/treasureisland.com.

■ Sam Riddle, The Veil Pavilion at Silverton. 702-263-7777/silvertoncasino.com.

A new brand in rodeo won’t hinder NFR’s popularity

 

By JOHN KATSILOMETES
LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

It seemed, for a couple of rocky weeks in December 2013, that the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo would haul out of Las Vegas for the greener pastures of Osceola County in central Florida. Las Vegas tourism officials and the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association eventually pulled the reins on that deal, negotiating a last-minute contract extension to keep the event in Las Vegas through 2024.

But during those negotiations, when it appeared as if the NFR would head for the shadow of Disney World in Orlando, Las Vegas officials seriously considered staging a new rodeo for the sport’s top athletes. The event would be gritty but flashy in a Vegas sort of way, lucrative for contestants and sponsors alike and would easily fill the void if and when the NFR bucked out of town.

The idea had serious backing — Las Vegas Events President Pat Christenson and South Point hotel owner Michael Gaughan, a leading NFR official in Las Vegas, were especially eager to plan such an event. 

That Vegas rodeo never happened, of course, with the return of the NFR. But three years on, such an event is butting heads with this year’s Wrangler NFR, beginning Thursday night and running through Dec. 10 at the Thomas & Mack Center. The Elite Rodeo Athletes contingent has lassoed (no shortage of ranch puns here) many of the sport’s top stars – including 13-time PRCA all-around world champ Trevor Brazile and bareback star Bobby Mote, a four-time PRCA world champion who happens to be ERA’s interim president.

Created by some of the sport’s leading competitors as a way to earn more money with a less-stringent schedule, the ERA finished its five-day inaugural championship event in Dallas on Nov. 13. The timeline would allow contestants to hop on a plane to Vegas and take part in the NFR, but the PRCA is not allowing its athletes to toggle between the ERA and its own sanctioned events.

As a result, the NFR field, simply from a competition standpoint, is lacking some major horsepower. Brazile, Mote, and such ERA event winners as Chandler Bownds (bull riding), Bray Armes (steer wrestling), Clay Tryan and Jade Corkill (team roping), Cort Scheer (saddle bronc), Lisa Lockhart (barrel racing), Shane Hanchey (tie-down roping) and Steven Dent (bareback riding) are ineligible to participate. 

But the PRCA is remains resolute. The depth of its card-carrying contestants is such that any event is brimming with star-quality athletes. “The talent pool we have goes much deeper than the top 15 guys in each event,” PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman says. “All the guys who win in Las Vegas, and the women in barrel racing, can compete at the highest level. Just in terms of competition, we will be great – you will see a 90-point bull ride and 86-point bareback ride, or a 4-second team roping score, just as often as ever this year.”

Stressman does offer, “In terms of personalities, of course, individuals will be missed. But the finals, this year, sold out faster than any in the past 31 years.”

The ERA is not going away, however, and will continue to hook some of the superstars in the sport. The scope of the event and the lure of Las Vegas will set the NFR apart. Stressman attended a PRCA rodeo at the Fort Bend County Fair in Rosenberg, Texas this summer. Eight kids who had competed in the youth bareback competition, all aged 7-8, asked to have their photo taken with the commissioner.

“In 10 years, we’re all going to be in Vegas,” one of the kids said to Stressman. “And we’ll show you this photo.”

“They are the lifeblood of our sport,” Stressman said. He didn’t need to point out the kids said “Vegas” as their goal. In rodeo, that destination is still self-evident.

National Finals Rodeo sellout streak reaches 300

By PATRICK EVERSON
LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

In the world of sports, there is perhaps no better indicator of success than the ability to consistently draw fans to an event, over a long period of time. In layman’s terms, to put butts in the seats.

To be sure, there are some incredible streaks on the books. The Green Bay Packers will have 326 consecutive home sellouts by the end of this season, in a streak dating to 1960, and that doesn’t count playoff games. In college football, Nebraska reached 355 home sellouts this year, going almost as far back as the Pack, to 1962.

But make no mistake, the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is right up there with the best of them. The first go-round of the 2016 WNFR rides at 6:45 p.m. Friday at the Thomas &Mack Center, setting off another run of 10 sold-out nights that will bring the Super Bowl of Rodeo’s streak to an even 300.

“When the WNFR moved in, we knew we were on to something,” said Pat Christenson, president of Las Vegas Events, which operates the WNFR, working in conjunction with the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

It took a couple of years for that “on to something” to really take hold, but since 1987, every night of the WNFR has been a sellout.

If you’re a baseball fan, you might say that pales when compared with the Boston Red Sox’s run of 820 games. Or in the NBA, the Portland Trail Blazers’ record tear of 814 games, or the NHL mark of 487 by the Colorado Avalanche, or Duke’s current run of 406 in men’s college basketball.

But try taking a little more of an apples-to-apples comparison. Boston’s streak spanned 10 years, from May 2003-April 2013. The Blazers’ run went from 1977-1995, Colorado’s stretched 11 years from 1995-2006, and Duke’s still-intact run started in 1990. NASCAR’S best Sprint Cup streak was at Bristol Motor Speedway, starting in August 1982 and ending in March 2010, a stretch of 55 sellouts over 28 years.

All fall short of the 30-year run by the WNFR. And even the streaks by the Packers and Huskers didn’t require either team to sell out their venues over the course of ostensibly a long week – 10 straight nights. In other words, seeing it simply as 300 straight sellouts is skewing the math.

“I think that’s looking at it wrong,” said Bill McBeath, president and CEO of the Cosmopolitan Las Vegas. McBeath also serves on the board for Las Vegas Events and is on its WNFR committee. “This is 30 straight years of sellouts. That’s how I look at it. In any sport, entertainment, I don’t know of any streak like that. Thirty years of sellouts is pretty amazing.”

Karl Stressman is overseeing his ninth WNFR as PRCA commissioner, and he’s been involved with the event for 20-plus years. He’s known nothing but the sellout streak — and it’s certainly led to many acquaintances being quite chummy this time of year.

“The surprising thing about it is every year, I have a lot more friends around this time than I have in February and March,” Stressman said with a laugh. “The conversation always gets around to, ‘By the way, if you have any extra tickets, call me.’ I always say, ‘Let’s cut to the chase here. I don’t have any tickets.’

“It’s been said this is the hardest ticket in sports. I’m not exactly sure if that’s correct, but I’d like to think it is. We sold out faster this year than ever in the history of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. That’s pretty blasted impressive that we continue to have that demand.”

Christenson was with the Thomas &Mack Center when the WNFR first arrived, and he’s been with Las Vegas Events since 2001. This is by no means his first rodeo — in fact, it’s his 32nd — and he can speak to the streak as well as anybody associated with the event.

“I think with the streak, there are two pieces that stand out in my mind,” he said. “One, just the fact that we sell out the venue every year, and then we go to our oversell with the Mad Dash, stuffing as many people into the Thomas &Mack as we can.”

For you WNFR novices, the Mad Dash is an opportunity each night for those without tickets to pay $10 admission, and if they can find an open seat in the upper levels, they can take in the show with 18,000 other fans. If they can’t find a seat, they can either watch from the Cowboy Corral, the concourse or get their money back up until 7:15 p.m.

“The second piece is how we’ve grown the experience beyond the Thomas &Mack,” Christenson said. “There are two or three times as many people here in town, to just be part of the experience.”

On the first piece, much of the credit must go to Shawn Davis, the WNFR general manager, who has held a key role with the event throughout its Vegas run. It was his idea to turn the event into an absolute on-time machine, with competition starting at 7 p.m. and finishing by 9, every night. He has also been the key to enhancing the entertainment value of the WNFR, while still squeezing it all into those two hours.

“What we’ve improved is the production and the entertainment of the show,” Christenson said. “When it first started, it really was just about rodeo. The top 15 contestants in each event, against the best stock. Shawn cut it down to two hours.

“Until the early ’90s, we used to have a four- or five-piece mariachi band. They played the same song after every ride. They might’ve had three or four songs, but they all sounded the same. Shawn added music, sound, lasers, fireworks. He pulled up the production value and turned up the volume.”

Initially, that put a burr under the collective saddle of longtime WNFR patrons.

“The older customers wanted to hang him,” Christenson said. “But now, even they don’t mind it. It created a tempo and energy for the event.”

The second piece is arguably even more important than the first, attracting tens of thousands of fans to Las Vegas for the first 10 days of December who might not spend a single evening at the Thomas &Mack Center. Scott Sibella has long been a part of making that happen, from his 1990s days downtown at the Golden Nugget (with McBeath, by the way) right up to his role now as president and COO of the MGM Grand, as well as on Las Vegas Events’ board and its WNFR committee.

“What we’ve created is an experience for everybody to come to Las Vegas and see what rodeo is all about, even if they don’t have a ticket,” Sibella said, while alluding to that massive sellout streak. “What that says is that it’s more than just the rodeo. It’s about the city of Las Vegas and what we deliver.”

The enhanced experience started with the Cowboy Christmas expo, which had modest beginnings but now is a huge shopping opportunity and an interactive entertainment experience. The expo joined forces last year with the Hunter and Outdoor Expo and now takes up 900,000 square feet in the Las Vegas Convention Center’s South Hall. And there are several other offshoot expos around town.

Then there’s the whole NFR After Dark experience, which is something more and more hotels and entertainment venues capitalize on each year. Whether it’s viewing parties from the live feed, pre- and post-go-round parties with live music, George Strait this Friday and Saturday at the new T-Mobile Arena, a host of other big-name acts at venues up and down the Strip, or a whole bunch of free concerts scattered all over the city, fans can literally go from dawn to dusk and well into the wee hours with Western lifestyle overload.

“The viewing parties at the hotels are a big thing, and they have not affected attendance at the rodeo at all,” said Michael Gaughan, owner of the South Point, which is arguably ground zero for all the cowboys and cowgirls during WNFR week. “These parties have just brought more people to town.”

Gaughan also serves on the LVE board and on the WNFR committee, and has had his fingers in the WNFR grease practically since the beginning in Vegas. He gave much of the credit to the late Bennie Binion, who was prepared to step up and salvage the event in its first couple of years here.

“It was a three-year contract with options,” Gaughan recalled of the initial deal. “Bennie said he’d pay for any losses after the second year, and we lost a little money that year. After it sold out the third year, we knew we had a winner. Probably after the fourth or fifth year, we put tickets on sale in February, and sold out by March. We looked like rocket scientists!”

Indeed, the WNFR to this day takes a dead time of year for the tourism industry and turns it into an early Christmas gift for the hotel-casinos. Christenson said it helped make the T&M solvent in its early days and obviously is a huge boon now.

“The rodeo kept the town alive in December,” said Gaughan, who now fills three ballrooms with 3,000 patrons per night for his viewing parties. “It used to be a ghost town, by far our worst month. Even New Year’s couldn’t save December. If you could break even, it was a good December. After about three or four years, this town came alive with the rodeo.”

It took a while for the Strip to jump on the cash cow, but Gaughan was quick to tip his Resistol to one of his competitors for doing just that.

“I’ll tell you who really picked up on it is Scott Sibella,” Gaughan said, noting the massive Gold Buckle Zone nightly viewing party at the MGM Grand Conference Center, among other efforts. “He gives me a run for my money.”

McBeath is all in at The Cosmopolitan, as well, as are most properties up and down the Strip and well beyond. Gaughan harbors no hard feelings for that toward Sibella, McBeath or any of his hotel-casino peers. In fact, all of them are happy to see everybody benefiting from the WNFR, thanks to the sea of fans embarking for the desert every December for 10 days of riding and roping.

“Look at our fan guide 10 years ago and look at it today,” Christenson said. “We didn’t need one 10 years ago. Now we do. It’s the continued evolution of the whole experience. Every year, we find more and more ways to connect to our fans. Every year, the strength of the ticket grows, so we’re confident in our streak. But all of the people who want a ticket and couldn’t get it are still coming for the experience.”

McBeath perhaps summed it up best.

“The marriage between a great sport and this incredible city was the perfect recipe for long-term success,” he said. “It speaks to a perfect partnership: a great entertainment experience embedded in the greatest entertainment destination in the world.”

Long live the streak!

Mobile app becoming essential tool for rodeo fans

 

The NFR app provides users with everything they need to know during the 10-day Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, from competition at the Thomas & Mack Center, to Cowboy Christmas, viewing parties, concerts and more. (Patrick Everson/Special to the Las Vegas Review-Journal

By PATRICK EVERSON
LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

While the sport of rodeo is certainly a tip of the Resistol to the old West, make no mistake, these folks have no problem creating and embracing the incredible technology of the present. Nowhere is that more apparent than in the mobile application for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

In fact, the NFR app is now in its sixth version, relaunched in October with new and enhanced features to help fans streamline the 10-day experience, whether they’re at the Thomas &Mack Center for competition, doing some shopping at Cowboy Christmas, taking in concerts or checking out any of the myriad other events going on during the WNFR.

“As more and more rodeo fans, and consumers in general, rely on their mobile devices, we have made it a priority to enhance our mobile platforms each year,” said Michael Mack, vice president of marketing for Las Vegas Events, which manages the WNFR and works in conjunction with the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. “When we first introduced the app, we were surprised by the response. Today, the technology is so good that there are many different elements we can offer to rodeo fans in planning their WNFR Experience.”

Indeed, the free app – available for both iPhone and Android – has a bevy of features that can help with scheduling, tickets, statistics, news, parking and maps, and even following the rodeo from home if you’re not in Vegas for the WNFR. In 2016, the rodeo’s 32nd year at the T&M, there are so many direct and indirect events that the app is a must to keep up.

“One of the challenges of the WNFR App is making sure that fans have information on all of the events and activities that take place over the 10 days,” Mack said. “There are literally hundreds of options, from Cowboy Christmas to autograph sessions, from the Wrangler NFR itself to the 35-plus viewing parties and post-event concerts. As a result, there are so many new features available this year, including an enhanced schedule feature and ‘What’s Hot?’ category, improved maps and a custom photo feature. The new format has been designed so that it is both easy to use and informative at the same time.”

Among the most popular aspects of the app is the Get Tagged promotion. Get Tagged serves as a contest that allows fans to collect entries into the “Prize Barn” by attending NFR Experience events throughout the city, including at Cowboy Christmas in the South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center and during nightly go-rounds at The Shoe, a new part of the experience at the Thomas &Mack Center. WNFR viewing parties at several hotel properties also serve as locations for Get Tagged.

Each time a registered fans goes into a designated location, the GPS-enabled technology of the WNFR app acknowledges that activity and provides an additional entry into the Prize Barn. Fans can collect tags at designated locations each day of the WNFR (Dec. 1-10), and the more tags one receives, the more chances to win prizes – including one particularly huge prize.

“The grand prize winner will receive a pair of plaza tickets to the 2017 Wrangler NFR,” Mack said, while expanding on why Get Tagged is such a popular tool. “We designed the Get Tagged promotion to reward NFR fans for doing the things that they already like to do.”

As popular as the Get Tagged promotion is, though, 

Mack said all facets of the WNFR application have been well-received by fans, giving them a way to plan out their rodeo experience right from the palm of their hand.

“In addition to the Get Tagged promotion, my hope is that fans find everything they are looking for, including social media integration, news updates and useful maps,” Mack said. “Beyond that, the schedule feature allows fans to add any event to their calendar. With so many ways to enjoy the WNFR Experience, we don’t want our fans to miss out on anything.”